Attractions

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City Attractions

Delhi's most famous monument, the Red Fort, stands not only as a powerful reminder of the Mughal era India but also a symbol of India's struggle for freedom. It was build by fifth Mughal emperor Shah Jahan, when he decided to shift his capital there from Agra in 1638. The fort's turbulent history includes being captured by the Sikhs and the British. To take your imagination back to the ancient era, a one hour sound and light show of the fort's history is held each evening.

Swaminarayan Akshardham

A relatively new attraction, this massive temple complex was built by the BAPS Swaminarayan Sanstha spiritual organization and opened in 2005. It's dedicated to showcasing Indian culture. As well as the astonishing architecture of the pink stone and white marble shrine the complex includes sprawling garden sculptures and boat ride Allow plenty of time to explore it thoroughly at least half a day Do note that cell phones and cameras are not permit...

...ted inside

Qutab Minar

Qutab Minar, the tallest brick minaret in the world, is an incredible example of early Indo–Islamic architecture. It was built in 1193, but the reason remains a mystery. Some believe that it was made to signify victory and the beginning of Muslim rule in India, while others say it was used to call the faithful to prayer. The tower has five distinct stories, and is covered with intricate carvings and verses from the holy Quran. There are als...

...o a number of other historic monuments on the site.

India Gate

The towering archway of India Gate at the center of New Delhi is a war memorial, built in memory of the Indian soldiers who lost their lives fighting for the British Army in World War I. At night it glows warmly under floodlights, and the gardens that line its boulevard are a popular place to enjoy a warm summer's evening. There's also a fun Children's Park that's ideal for kids....

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Bahai (Lotus) Temple

The Bahai Temple is commonly called the Lotus Temple, as it's shaped like a lotus flower. It's particularly pretty at night, when it's attractively lit up. Made out of concrete covered in white marble, the temple belongs to the Bahai Faith, which proclaims the unity of all people and religions. Everybody is welcome there....

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Red Fort

Delhi's most famous monument, the Red Fort, stands not only as a powerful reminder of the Mughal era India but also a symbol of India's struggle for freedom. It was build by fifth Mughal emperor Shah Jahan, when he decided to shift his capital there from Agra in 1638. The fort's turbulent history includes being captured by the Sikhs and the British. To take your imagination back to the ancient era, a one hour sound and light show of the fort's hi...

...story is held each evening.

Laxminarayan Temple

If you're able to squeeze just one more temple into your Delhi sightseeing itinerary, make it Laxminarayan Temple (Birla Mandir). It's also one of the newest such sites in the city. This impressive looking Hindu place of worship was opened by Mahatma Gandhi in 1939 in Connaught Place as a dedication to the goddess of prosperity, Laxmi (shrines dedicated to other faiths are also included on the site, a condition stipulated by Gandhi). Spread acros...

...s nearly eight acres, the grounds are a delight to explore, and feature lush tropical gardens, fountains, and sculptures.

Gurudwara Bangla Sahib

Delhi's most important Sikh place of worship, the 18th-century Gurdwara Bangla Sahib is near Connaught Place and is well worth a visit. Highlights include its magnificent pool, the Sarovar, at the heart of this large complex, as well as its famous gold dome and flagpole....

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Jama Masjid

The Jama Masjid is one of India's largest mosques and was the final architectural feat of Shah Jahan. Completed in 1658, this beautiful structure features three gateways, four angled towers, and two 40-meter-high minarets built using red sandstone and white marble and attractively alternated in vertical stripes. Visitors can climb to the top of the southern minaret for spectacular views of Old Delhi, and afterwards visit the large central pool us...

...ed for washing before prayers (visitors must take off their shoes and be appropriately dressed before entering; non-Muslims aren't permitted during prayers

Humayun's Tomb

Set in a lovely, large square garden, Humayun's Tomb is a lofty mausoleum constructed of white marble and red sandstone. It was designed as a prototype of the Taj Mahal in Agra and is an excellent example of Mughal architecture. Built in the mid-16th century by Haji Begum as a memorial to her husband by Humayun's senior widow, the tomb is surrounded by lush formal gardens and other tombs including Humayun's barber and the Tomb of Isa Khan (the ar...

...chitect of the Taj Mahal), a fine example of Lodi architecture and octagonal in shape. A fun thing to do is to try and catch a glimpse of this spectacular structure after nightfall when it's illuminated.

Rajpath and Rashtrapati Bhavan

Rajpath, also known as the King's Way, is New Delhi's traditional ceremonial boulevard. Running from Rashtrapati Bhavan, the official presidential residence, past such important city landmarks as Vijay Chowk and India Gate all the way to the National Stadium, this broad avenue is flanked by trees, grass, and ponds and comes alive each January 26th during the Republic Day Parade, when countless thousands gather to celebrate the anniversary of the ...

...country's independence.